Animals

Farmer and his band perform fantastic full-band concert for cows

February 13th, 2020

Ed Henderson manages a dairy farm, Shenandoah Dairy, in North Central Florida containing roughly 3,700 cows. The farm appears to be a humble, serene spot with green pastures, tall, lush trees, and wide-open spaces.

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FloridaDairy Source: FloridaDairy

Ed happens to have a passion for the trombone and regularly participates in a fully-fledged jazz ensemble – farming is just his profession.

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FloridaDairy Source: FloridaDairy

As a member of a 17-piece jazz band, Ed one day struck up a brilliant idea, attempting to combine his musical talents with his dairy work. He invited his band to perform a concert for his thousands of cows.

The far-fetched idea quickly caught steam and things were soon set in motion. Once the band members agreed, the concert preparation took quite some time.

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FloridaDairy Source: FloridaDairy

The Gateway City Big Band set themselves up in the middle of the farm, a plain area with seemingly endless fields of green grass in all directions.

For the musically ignorant, a jazz big band, at the least, generally consists of over ten instrumentalists, including typical jazz brass trumpets and trombones, saxophones, and a rhythm section, according to Allmusic.

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FloridaDairy Source: FloridaDairy

Ed’s band is quite the ensemble, itself featuring numerous trombones, trumpets, saxophones, a bass guitar, keyboard, and drum kit – the classic elements of any great jazz big band.

On what appears to be a beautiful Florida day with some cloud cover, the group kicks things off with a jazz-tinged rendition of “Tequila Song” by The Champs – a recognizable classic.

Once the band starts playing, a complete and utter migration commences. The cows can be seen flocking from all corners of the farm to attend this extraordinary event. Some of the aerial shots are magnificent.

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FloridaDairy Source: FloridaDairy

Seriously, some of the cows ran – or trotted – hundreds of yards to get a front row spot to the concert, eventually lining-up and self-organizing rather intelligently.

The band continues to chug and jam along, continuing their cover of “Tequila Song” while the cows gather around to watch and listen.

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FloridaDairy Source: FloridaDairy

It’s hard to blame them – the band can certainly carry a tune.

Conversely, the band had a front row seat to a spectacular assemblage of cattle. The band’s performance evidently served as quite an interesting cow social experiment. The cows receive a free concert, while the band receives a first-hand view of the power of music on other organisms. Every species involved wins.

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FloridaDairy Source: FloridaDairy

All in all, the Gateway City Big Band’s performance rocked (or I guess, jazzed). The band and the cows appeared to have a great time.

This whole experiment begs the question – what’s a cow’s favorite genre? Some may say Moo-town, but they seem to love jazz, too. The band’s first farm performance was a huge success, but next time they need more cowbell.

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Source: FloridaDairy

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