Culture

Unique Tiny Home Is A Replica Caboose

December 10th, 2018

The “tiny house” movement started gaining attention in the U.S. around 10 years ago when people read Sarah Susanka’s popular book The Not So Big House. The movement was a reaction to American consumerism and new houses growing ever bigger, averaging well over 2000 square feet.

While there were earlier pioneers of the movement, it’s clear that the phenomenon has swept the country and people from coast to coast are building unique and beautiful “tiny homes,” from anywhere between 900 square feet down to a mere 75 square feet. It’s a perfect statement for those wanting to live a more simple and less cluttered life.

Enter this adorable and unique tiny house, designed to look like a train caboose:

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Tiny Home Tour Source: Tiny Home Tour

And while we don’t know the exact square footage, it’s clear that its owner put immense time and effort into its small but beautiful interior.

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Tiny Home Tour Source: Tiny Home Tour

And while it might be tiny, this hallway actually makes it look rather spacious. Sadly, we don’t have shots of the rooms coming off it, but that’s likely where the kitchen and bathroom are located.

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Tiny Home Tour Source: Tiny Home Tour

We’re definitely digging the sign, which looks like an antique. The whole unit is meant to evoke a cross between a working caboose and an Art Deco train station, and we think it’s a success!

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Tiny Home Tour Source: Tiny Home Tour

The owner built the home from scratch, adding Art Deco style lamps to give it a historical feel.

And here’s a closer look at the pressed tin ceiling:

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Tiny Home Tour Source: Tiny Home Tour

He even put in a tiny cast iron wood stove. As you can see, the stovepipes are on the exterior, providing a little less clutter inside and allowing your eyes to take in the amazing molding around the windows and ceilings.

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Tiny Home Tour Source: Tiny Home Tour

The room is designed to resemble a historical workman’s lounge car from the early years of railroading in America, with a few modern updates, like a flat-screen TV.

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Tiny Home Tour Source: Tiny Home Tour

And if you take another look at the first photo from the outside, you’ll see that there’s some space for a tiny second floor in this home. Amazingly, it has a full staircase that leads up to the loft (instead of the space-saving ladders that many tiny homes have – if they even have a loft space!).

And take a close look at the piece of memorabilia in the display case – it’s a sign from the Milwaukee Railroad’s hobo camp, where workers and train hoppers set up tents in between train rides.

The Milwaukee Railroad once saw the Chicago & North Western line go through it and parts have now been restored and relocated to a children’s outdoor train park in Eau Claire, Wisconsin.

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Tiny Home Tour Source: Tiny Home Tour

When you walk upstairs there’s even more beautiful wood and a ceiling with recessed lighting (presumably so you don’t knock your head against anything up there!):

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Tiny Home Tour Source: Tiny Home Tour

It’s a great space if you need a place to relax away from anyone else inside this tiny house.

We can imagine having a mattress on the platform for extra sleeping space, but it turns out that this tiny home owner is going to fill it with railroad memorabilia that he’s collected over the years.

For those who aren’t familiar with their railroad history, the Milwaukee Road was a nickname for the Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul & Pacific (CMStP&P), which spanned 11,000 miles from Louisville, Kentucky all the way to the Puget Sound.

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Tiny Home Tour Source: Tiny Home Tour

The home was built by North Park Homes & Cabins in Minocqua, Wisconsin. You can really appreciate all the work that was done when you see what these tiny homes typically look like inside:

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Tiny Home for Us Source: Tiny Home for Us

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Source: Tiny Home Tour

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