Entertainment

Dancers’ cheerful Charleston brings smiles across the internet

May 20th, 2020

Dancing has been around practically since the beginning of human existence, the first records of dance date back to 3300 BC with Indian and Egyptian cultures but it began even before that. It’s therapeutic, fun, and sacred in many cultures. In this video, 3 dancers’ do the legendary Charleston dance and people on the internet absolutely love it.

Flappers from the 1920s would be proud of these three!

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Flickr Source: Flickr

In the 1920s the Charleston dance was invented and swept across the country, almost 100 years later, these three woman show as that it’s still alive and thriving

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YouTube Screenshot Source: YouTube Screenshot

The Charleston is a famous dance from the 1920s that involves swinging your legs and flamboyant arm movements all while keeping a fast pace. It was invented in Charleston, South Carolina, and was extremely popular among women who were called ‘Flappers.’ They wore awesome outfits, that you’ve almost surely seen on Halloween still to this day.

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YouTube Screenshot Source: YouTube Screenshot

In this video, Amy Young choreographed an incredible routine for the Wedding World Exhibition in her home town of Bath, England. This ancient city is the largest city in the county of Somerset and was built by the Romans who named it Bath for the massive baths that are constructed around the city.

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Flickr Source: Flickr

Right from the get-go, Amy and her dancers’ begin doing the Charleston, swinging their arms and crossing their feet

With marvelous flapper outfits on, the 3 dancers flawlessly do the energetic dance right on cue with each other. Their timing is impeccable, every step and movement is in unison and they manage to keep huge smiles on their faces the whole time.

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YouTube Screenshot Source: YouTube Screenshot

As they go through the routine, the dancers cheerfully glide across the stage into different formations. At one point, they form a line and use their arms to make somewhat of an optical illusion before breaking into a triangle and continuing to do the Charleston.

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YouTube Screenshot Source: YouTube Screenshot

These dancers are brilliant, never skipping a beat the entire routine and keeping the energy high

Toward the end of the routine, Amy and the dancers throw one hand in the air while simultaneously spinning in a circle and kicking their other hand with one foot. The fact that they’re doing all this in high heels is just unbelievable!

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YouTube Screenshot Source: YouTube Screenshot

They pick it up a notch for the end of the routine, going even faster than they were before. With their backs to the audience, the dancers rapidly shuffle their feet and swing their arms while still managing to stay perfectly in sync with one another.

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YouTube Screenshot Source: YouTube Screenshot

For the grand finale, the dancers add a spin before striking a pose and quickly shaking their hands together

There’s a certain nostalgia to dance routines like this, it’s like a window back into the 1920s when this dance was created.

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YouTube Screenshot Source: YouTube Screenshot

People on the internet couldn’t get enough of the threesome doing the Charleston, hundreds of thousands of dance fans watched the routine in awe.

This video has almost been viewed 900k times on YouTube, with 4.4k hitting the thumbs up

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YouTube Screenshot Source: YouTube Screenshot

What an outstanding dance routine, from the outfits to the sensational choreography, they really nail this. Amy Young and her dancers are true professionals, you can find them dancing their way into hearts all over England. You can also see more awesome dances at Amy Young’s website. To see them nail the Charleston, watch the video below!

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Source: YouTube, ThoughtCO, London Toolkit

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