Life
No one showed up to US Air Force veteran's funeral until 6 baseball players showed up
The coach couldn't have been more proud.
Michael Dabu
10.11.22

War veterans didn’t just sacrifice their lives for the country but also their time which they could’ve spent with the people dear to their hearts. Sadly, this sometimes results in them not being remembered by the people who they expect to be there during their final moments – their family and friends.

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Unfortunately, that’s what exactly happened to a war veteran at his funeral when nobody, not a single friend or family member showed up.

Forgotten heroes.

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On February 8, 2022, 94-year-old U.S. Air Force veteran Ralph Lambert passed away but not even a single person was present to bid him a final goodbye. The U.S. Air Force veteran served the country from 1950 to 1971.

It’s sad that despite over two decades of serving the country, aside from countrymen, not even his family of friends attended to give him the proper send-off. It’s definitely heartbreaking to be abandoned and forgotten by almost everyone at your funeral.

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Nobody, let alone veterans deserve to be disrespected like this, don’t you agree?

Thankfully, a new face of heroes stepped in to give Lambert a proper send-off.

The kindhearted coach of the Menard High School’s baseball team in Alexandria, Louisiana, Jordan Marks wasn’t letting the veteran be unrecognized for his heroism for he knew exactly what to do.

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As soon as he heard about the sad story about Lambert who was about to be cremated with no service, he immediately went into action and picked six of his baseball players to go and attend the funeral and serve as the veterans’ pallbearers.

According to coach Marks, being involved in such an act of kindness would teach the players the real value of someone’s life. Aside from the game of baseball, it would also enlighten the youngsters about the true game of life.

It’s also one way of giving back to the community, let alone to a war veteran like Lambert.

Doing the right thing.

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Lambert was no ordinary citizen, he was a mighty soldier who fought for the liberty of the country and they wish to give him the hero treatment up to his last moment on land. It’s a life lesson coach Marks wants his players to understand because his role as their coach doesn’t end on the baseball field but is also extended up to their cores as human beings and members of society.

Just like during a game where there is teamwork, camaraderie, and teammates look after each other, these sports fundamentals also apply in real life. Marks wants his players to be engaged and be supportive of other members of the community.

After talking about his plans, six seniors were then listed to attend Lambert’s funeral service and carry his coffin. Hunter Foster, Ashton, Brodnax, Jackson Ford, Jacob Giordano, Cameron Kinder, and Ashton Veade were the seniors who showed up and carried the U.S. Air Force veteran’s flag-draped casket to the Central Louisiana Veterans Cemetery, where he was given full military honors.

Proud members of the community.

After being given the chance to give honor to a veteran, Jacob Giordano shared that they felt nothing but honor when they served as Lambert’s pallbearers. While Cameron Kinder said that people tend to forget that a lot of people have no families and that a mighty soldier like Lambert deserves nothing but a proper goodbye.

The six seniors’ heartwarming act of kindness spread like wildfire and soon, people came in showering them with lots of love, appreciation, and support. Both the people online and from their community commended them for their genuinely kind hearts.

May this sad yet beautiful story remind us of our mighty war veterans. Let’s not forget their bravery and sacrifices for the country.

Watch the video below to see what a simple gesture of appreciation means to a veteran.

Please SHARE this with your friends and family.

By Michael Dabu
hi@sbly.com
Michael Dabu is a contributor at SBLY Media.
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